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Graduate Courses

Course Number Course Title Course Description
THEA 2000 Research/Thesis MA Degree Individual research designed by the MA student in connection with his or her thesis.
THEA 2110 Secondary Emphasis- Pedagogy

The student will focus on an area of specialization designed to supplement foundational performance pedagogy. Under supervision and advisement from faculty, the student will choose an area of specialization (which may include voice, movement, advanced acting techniques, stage combat, directing, etc.) based on their own present experiences and create a strategy and timeline for completion of chosen goals. The quantity of knowledge and experience to be achieved will be discussed between the advisor and student at the beginning of the course.  The student will meet with their advisory on a regular basis and write a research or response paper summarizing and analyzing their experience.

THEA 2120 Production Mentorship

The student will serve as actor, director, coach or other supportive function of a main-stage production at the University of Pittsburgh. This role will include active mentorship and teaching of undergraduate performers. Under supervision and advisement from faculty, the student will create a syllabus outlining their own research questions for their mentorship role on the production and how it may inform their own pedagogical practices.  The student will write a research or response paper summarizing and analyzing their experience.

THEA 2135 Course Development Student designs performance course in preparation for classroom laboratory for written thesis.
THEA 2147 Techniques Performance Pedagogy Techniques in Performance Pedagogy is designed for graduate students to address the unique needs of teaching theatre performance at the college level. Students will examine various Stanislavski-based training methods and compare those methods with physical and/or ensemble-based methodologies as they apply to university training programs (in a BA, BFA or MFA program).  Students will formulate their own style and teaching philosophy as they develop lesson plans, create innovative pedagogical exercises, conduct warm up sessions, coach acting scenes and develop methods of grading performance work.  In addition, students will create a sample master class in order to be competitive on the academic job market.
THEA 2149 Professional Orientation Experimental learning credits based outside of the university.  Focus on some aspects of performance that sustains the pedagogical experience.
THEA 2155 Directed Study – Pedagogy Faculty directed supervision in the study of theory and practice of education in the theatre.
THEA 2160 Directed Study – Directing Faculty directed supervision in the study of theory, preparation and execution of directing in the theatre.
THEA 2170 Directing Study – Set, Costume, Lights Faculty directed supervision in the study of theory, preparation and execution of design for the theatre.

THEA 2200

Directed Study - History, Literature, Criticism, Theory

Faculty directed supervision in teh study of history, literature, criticism and theory of the theatre.
THEA 2202 Theories of Theatre and Drama These seminars change each semester.  Examples of recent topics discussed include:

- Narrative and Drama

- Manners Comedy

- Historiography

- Performance Studies

- The Body and Performance in the Americas

- Mobility and Transience in Performance

- Latin America Theatre and Performance

- Memory and the Narrative Trace: Action, Trauma, and Performance

- Bearing Witness and the Public Sphere

THEA 2204

 

Theories of Acting and Directing

Students hone, diversify and/or solidify their directing craft through étude staging assignments and personalized, practical projects designed in consultation with the instructor. Students will engage with foundational director-driven, directing and devising texts in our field, from Brecht, Artuad, and Growtoski to Aikalitis, Bogart, and others, with particular attention to both practical and pedagogical application as well as critical evaluations of methods, cultural institutions, and representation. Students will gain facility with expectations of academic institutions and programs including, but not limited to:  moving between roles of director, coach and acting teacher in production; scaffolding connections between rehearsal, performance and studio work; collaborating within an academic department; mobilizing community-academic and/or interdisciplinary engagement through production work; practice as research; and standards for documenting, narrating and framing directorial work across institutional environments and positions (ie, as an MFA, a PhD, an MFA-PhD; at R1, liberal arts and/or community colleges).

THEA 2205 World Theatre:
 500 BCE to 1640
World Theatre 500 BCE to 1640 investigates histories of theatre and performance (scripts, embodiment, design, audiences, conventions, cultural functions, etc.) within local and global social, artistic and political contexts, from classical Athens to Edo Japan, colonial Mexico City to Shakespeare’s Globe. The course focuses on evidence and interpretation as well as historical causation.
THEA 2206 World Theatre:
1640-1890

This course is the second in a world theatre history sequence designed to explore the development of dramatic forms and theatre practices from the 5th century B.C.E. to the present. In World Theatre: 1640 to 1890 we will discuss the history of theatre arts—which includes looking at drama, design, performance traditions and audiences--from the comedies of Restoration England to emerging realism of Buchner, Zola and Ibsen. Framed by questions of documentary interpretation and historical causation, the course will analyze the larger contexts of theatrical events, including social and political history, as well as the development of non-theatrical art forms. In addition, we will discuss some contemporary scholarship examining these theatrical events.

THEA 2207 World Theatre:
1890-the Present

This is the third in a world theatre history sequence designed to explore the development of dramatic forms and theatre practices from the 5th century B.C.E. to the present. In World Theatre: 1890 to the present, we will discuss the history of the theatrical arts—which includes looking at drama, design, performance traditions and audiences—from the late dramas of Ibsen to the plays of Beckett and Pinter. Framed by questions of documentary interpretation and historical causation, the course will analyze the larger contexts of theatrical events, including social and political history, as well as the development of non-theatrical art forms. In addition, we will discuss some contemporary scholarship examining these theatrical events.

THEA 2110 Theatre Pedagogy and Faculty Development

Each Fall, graduate students instructing for the first time in our department will enroll in THEA 2110: Theatre Pedagogy and Faculty Development, the Theatre Arts Department’s internal faculty development course designed to prepare MA, MFA and PhD students to excel at effective teaching within both the academy at large and the unique demands of the field of Theatre and Performance Studies. The course emphasizes the support and development of first time teachers, while simultaneously providing graduate students with foundational skills, information, and resources that will aid them throughout their graduate career and beyond.

THEA 2216 Advanced Theory and Methodology These seminars change each semester.  Examples of recent topics discussed include:

- Rhythm in Text and Performance

- Global Perspectives on Race and Performance

- Nationalism and Performance: Western Europe 1700s

- Transnational US Performance in the Long Nineteenth Century

- Sectarianism and Performance in Ireland

- Modernity/Coloniality/Decoloniality

- Influence and Adaptation: Coopted Cultures and Publics on the American Stage

- Nationalism and Performance: Western Europe 1700s

- Formations of the Americas: pre-Contact to Criollo Consciousness

- The Greek Tragic Form in American Marginalized Performance

THEA 2990 Independent Study The instructor and the student will work together concerning the course content.
THEA 2991

Professional Internship – Playwriting

Internships for highly qualified graduate students accepted for work appropriate to their degree programs at professional theatres or other professional producing organizations. Supervised jointly by the department and the participating institution.
THEA 2992 Professional Internship – Dramaturgy
THEA 2993 Professional Internship – Directing
THEA 2994 Professional Internship – Acting
THEA 2995 Professional Internship – Design
THEA 2996 Professional Internship –
Stage Management
THEA 2997 Professional Internship – Theatre Business
THEA 2998 Professional Internship – Technology
THEA 3000 Dissertation Research PhD  Individual research designed by the PhD student in connection with his or her dissertation